A simple map of the property has been sketched showing the path of rain water flow

Required item – worth 10 points

 

What is this?

A very basic map of your property with hand-drawn arrows and notes showing where rain water enters and leaves. See our samples, below.

How do I do this?

On my own

  1. Start with a map of your property. You can draw it by hand (no need to be fancy). Some people use a copy of their property survey and others like to download maps from the internet – it's your choice. See the samples below.
  2. Grab a pencil to draw arrows and jot notes to show where stormwater comes from and goes. If water flows onto your property from an adjacent landowner, stream or drainage ditch, show that. If you're in an area with significant slope or hills, add it. If it collects in a low spot or rain garden before soaking into the ground, mark it down.
  3. Unless there is a pond or wetland on your property, some of your water probably flows off site. Do you know where it goes?

Hire some help

There’s no need to pay for this. If you’re stuck, we can help you during a property visit.

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Why is this important?

This exercise helps you understand where your stormwater goes and is a first step in recognizing your property’s impact on clean water in your local stream, pond or lake. It also helps you think about ways you might be able to help lessen flood issues that might exist in your community.

• If you can collect rain water or direct it to places where it can soak into the ground, flooding in this region is lessened.

• If you can reduce the amount of lawn chemicals or soil erosion washing off your property, water is cleaner and healthier for people, frogs, fish and other beneficial wildlife.

Lake County is a very watery landscape, with many streams, lakes and ponds that can become overwhelmed by heavy rains or snowmelt. Long ago much of this water would slowly soak into the ground but nowadays it frequently is channeled into the nearest waterway. Lawn chemicals and eroded soils are carried along, causing water pollution.

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